Hunger and riots

starvation begins

GOVERNMENTS

around the world PLANNyouED THIS

 

30 May 2020

Civil Unrest in America! (2020 EVENTS)

 

Source:

https://youtu.be/SXQz57JvYY0

20 may 2020

15 april 2020

14 April 2020

SA Lockdown: Chaos in Mitchells Plain as residents clash with Police over food parcels

 

Source:

https://youtu.be/EaRFJXUlGok

 

25 March 2020

Protesters, anti-quarantine groups call for end to coronavirus closures 

BY J. EDWARD MORENO - 04/14/20 11:48 AM EDT

 

Growing unrest from coronavirus stay-at-home orders in place across the country have resulted in organized protests and the creation of anti-quarantine organizations across the nation.

On Monday, about 100 protesters crowded the Ohio statehouse as Gov. Mike DeWine (R) gave his daily coronavirus briefing, according to The Columbus Dispatch. They demanded an end to the state’s stay-at-home order, which the governor extended to May 1 earlier this month. 

The protestors join Republican lawmakers in the state in pressuring the governor to reopen the economy. 

“We need to get the economy open, even if that means social distancing of some sort for months to come,” State Sen. Andrew Brenner (R ), wrote in a Facebook post. “We can’t stay like this much longer, and the hundreds of thousands of Ohioans who’ve lost their jobs or the thousands of small business owners can’t keep doing this either, or their lives will be irreparably destroyed.”

Protests in the state came the same day President Trump received pushback from a number of governors after he claimed he has the full authority to reopen the country. Trump has been a proponent of reopening the country as soon as possible, saying several times "we can't have the cure be worse than the problem."

“It is the decision of the President, and for many good reasons. With that being said, the Administration and I are working closely with the Governors, and this will continue,” Trump tweeted Monday. “A decision by me, in conjunction with the Governors and input from others, will be made shortly!”

The Michigan Conservative Coalition and Michigan Freedom Fund are planning an in-vehicle protest at the statehouse Wednesday to demand an end to Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s stay-at-home order, which she recently extended to April 30 as the state continues to see some of the highest rates of infection in the nation. 

The conservative organizations described Whitmer’s mitigation measures as "erratic, unilateral orders that threaten Michiganders' economic existence," according to the Lansing State Journal.

Michigan’s order is particularly aggressive, banning home visits between friends and the purchase of nonessential goods. U.S. Rep. Justin Amash (I-Mich.), who has teased a third-party presidential bid, has said Whitmer's orders "do little to combat COVID-19 but much to curb freedoms and escalate tensions. The governor should re-evaluate before she loses public support for more essential health and safety practices."

 

Many of @GovWhitmer’s latest measures do little to combat COVID-19 but much to curb freedoms and escalate tensions. The governor should re-evaluate before she loses public support for more essential health and safety practices.

Thread: https://t.co/zgjJOoza4H

— Justin Amash (@justinamash) April 13, 2020

 

Source:

https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/492693-protesters-call-for-an-end-to-coronavirus-closures

 

'Everything buried in mud': Hurricane Eta's devastating blow to Honduras

 

  • People walk along a street in Planeta, municipality of La Lima, one of the hardest hit communities. Photograph: Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

 

Flooding left thousands trapped for days without food or water and death toll may never be known

 

Across a sea of putrid mud a metre or so deep, Marvin Argueta pointed to the remnants of what a week ago was his home on the banks of the Chamelecón River. He had lost everything – but he still considers himself lucky.

“If we hadn’t got out in time, we all would have died,” said Argueta, 22, who along with his wife and four children abandoned their house when the flood waters reached waist height in the middle of the night. “A friend of mine lost his entire family.”

Argueta and his family are among hundreds of thousands in Honduras who lost everything they own in floods caused by Hurricane Eta. The storm made landfall off the coast of Nicaragua on 3 November as a category 4 hurricane before slowly moving across Honduras and then Guatemala.

“When we first came back to see our home we cried because everything was buried in mud,” said Argueta, who recently lost his job in construction and is now living underneath a nearby bridge with about a hundred other families. “We didn’t have anywhere else to go.”

 

Across a sea of putrid mud a metre or so deep, Marvin Argueta pointed to the remnants of what a week ago was his home on the banks of the Chamelecón River. He had lost everything – but he still considers himself lucky.

“If we hadn’t got out in time, we all would have died,” said Argueta, 22, who along with his wife and four children abandoned their house when the flood waters reached waist height in the middle of the night. “A friend of mine lost his entire family.”

Argueta and his family are among hundreds of thousands in Honduras who lost everything they own in floods caused by Hurricane Eta. The storm made landfall off the coast of Nicaragua on 3 November as a category 4 hurricane before slowly moving across Honduras and then Guatemala.

“When we first came back to see our home we cried because everything was buried in mud,” said Argueta, who recently lost his job in construction and is now living underneath a nearby bridge with about a hundred other families. “We didn’t have anywhere else to go.”

 

  • People who were forced to abandon their homes in the in the aftermath of Hurricane Eta take refuge in a makeshift camp underneath an overpass. Photograph: Seth Sidney Berry/SOPA Images/REX/Shutterstock

 

In Guatemala, scores of people are feared dead after rain tore off the side of a mountain, burying the village of Quejá. As the flood waters recede in Honduras the storm’s full toll there is starting to emerge. Although the official death count remains low, people are returning to what’s left of their homes to find Dantesque scenes of human and animal remains half-buried in mud, and there are countless others whose loved ones have disappeared.

In the valley surrounding San Pedro Sula, several rivers and flood canals overflowed so high that tens of thousands were trapped for days on rooftops without food or water. The total number of victims will likely never be known.

“I’m worried about my family because I haven’t heard anything from them,” said Raquel Aguilar, a resident of La Lima, one of the hardest hit communities in San Pedro Sula. Tears streamed down her cheeks. “The last picture they sent us all that you could see were the rooftops.”

 

Economists believe the loss could be greater even than that inflicted in 1998 by Hurricane Mitch, the most destructive storm to ever hit Central America and the second most deadly Atlantic hurricane in recorded history.

The brunt of the damage caused by Mitch was borne by the capital city of Tegucigalpa and the south of the country.

This time, however, the epicentre of the destruction is near the north coast, around San Pedro Sula, the country’s second-largest city and economic motor, home to more than 2 million people.

“There are 13 communities along the tributaries of the Ulua River that are still mostly isolated and where many still are on the roofs of their homes waiting for a rescue,” said Ismael Moreno, a Jesuit priest and director of the non-profit media outlet Radio Progreso.

 

  • Hurricane Eta dropped as much as a meter of rain in some areas. Photograph: Yoseph Amaya/Getty Images

 

The response by the Honduran government to the threat of Hurricane Eta – and later the destruction left in its wake – has been harshly criticised.

Hoping to stimulate the economy following the downturn caused by Covid-19, the government had scheduled a special holiday for last week that it was slow to cancel despite forecasts of a looming natural disaster that proved exceptionally accurate.

“By 1 November, the information about the strength and path of Hurricane Eta was already known,” said Moreno. “Nonetheless, on 2 November the government continued calling for people to go on vacation.”

The head of the country’s emergency response unit – a former reggaeton rapper who went by the name “Killa” and whose critics say holds few qualifications for such an important job – had only been in the position a few weeks before Eta struck.

 

  • Scores of people have died or remain unaccounted for as the remnants of Hurricane Eta unleashed floods and triggered landslides. The total number of victims will likely never be known. Photograph: Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

 

That an event comparable to the catastrophe of Mitch could happen again suggests that not only were lessons forgotten, but also that conditions in Honduras have left the country even more vulnerable to disaster, said Moreno.

“Hurricane Mitch brought seven days of constant rain,” said Moreno. “Eta poured rain for 48 hours. Nonetheless, the water from Eta has flooded areas that 22 years ago weren’t flooded by Mitch and it has left a number of people who’ve lost everything that’s even greater than that of Mitch.”

 

The effects of the pandemic will make rebuilding this time around even harder. The Honduran government has called for aid from the international community, but like its own response to Hurricane Eta, the response has been slow and insufficient. So far, the United States Agency for International Development has pledged a mere $100,000 for what, in all likelihood, will turn out to be a multi-billion-dollar disaster.

No expressions of condolences or concern have come from the White House.

In the years following Mitch, Hondurans migrated to the US in significant numbers for the first time. Many of those migrants were granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) that has allowed them to live in the US legally ever since, but which has been under attack by the Trump administration.

Guatemala has announced that it will request TPS for its citizens in the US due to the damage caused by Eta, and it’s expected that Honduras, which was hit much harder than its neighbour, will follow suit.

With the pandemic and now Eta, several of the factors that have forced so many to migrate in recent years are now arguably worse than ever.

“The Eta storm has reopened wounds that have been bleeding for many years,” said Moreno. “We’ll continue with an economic situation and unemployment that will force even more to migrate to the United States.”

 

Source:

 

 

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